Facing Pride of Abandonment

Despite the number of times she said it, I do not think she was “proud” she gave away her child. At least I do not think she was proud in the literal sense of the word. Merriam Webster gives a simple definition of proud:

“very happy and pleased because of something you have done, something you own, someone you know or are related to, etc.”

Could she actually be very happy and pleased she gave her child away to strangers? I suppose anything is possible and it is not for me to challenge someone else’s truth but I spoke to her in depth following a session and my suspicion is that she is struggling and has been trying to make sense of what happened to her and her child. She wants to be okay with her decision and who she has become as a result of it. Proud she overcame some challenges? Proud she made something of her life after surrendering her daughter? That seems more appropriate.

Also important to note that she recommended a birth mother workbook that was published by a well known Mormon/LDS birth mother that regularly promotes mothers abandoning their child to adoption. This was very telling. In that author’s world view adoption is a wonderful thing. The Church of Latter Day Saints says so, right? Quite possible the proud mother was also Mormon. The intoxicating power of the LDS kool-aid cannot be understated.

Never Proud
I was never proud or happy or at peace with giving my daughter away. I was rather miserable from day four of her birth (with day three being the last day I saw her). I have spent 30 years trying to make sense of it. I have blogged, talked, read, cried and more for many years. Through those years I have encountered many people who objected to my particular approach to my very personal experience. My mother tries to explain it away, suggest it is a good thing. Friends will say I did the best I could given the support I had. Still others will focus on the wonderful gift I gave to an infertile couple. Each one of these encounters results in one thing – invalidation. Intentional or not, when others try to wish away, fix, enhance or pretty up my experience you are telling me my feelings are wrong. Read Just Sit There for more on that.

I clearly disagreed with this proud mother but I tried hard to meet her where she was at. There may be very good reasons for why she is there. I did not like where she was but it is her story. She might change her mind. She might need help in the future. She might hit that wall many of us have hit and suddenly not be so proud of her actions. Should that day come, I hope she is surrounded by individuals who can just be with her. Should the day never arrive, I hope she finds a child that is as happy about being separated from her as she is from him or her. Reunions work well when both mother and child share the same world view, no?